3rd International Metasequoia Symposium 本文へジャンプ
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The Reports of the Third International Metasequoia Symposium
August 3 to 8, 2010, Osaka

For Print (PDF ver.)

As it was expected in advance, an intense hotness continued everyday in Osaka. All attendants walked in the Nagai Park where many cicadas sing noisily from Nagai Station to the Museum with sweating.
There are 60 attendants in total, 29 from 9 foreign countries (China, USA, Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, Italy, Hungary, Germany and Switzerland) and 31 Japanese. There were 26 oral presentations of five sessions and 16 poster presentations as shown in the program.
On behalf of the organizing committee, I would like to say our gratitude to the Tokyo Club, Expo '90 Foundation and Commemorative Organization for the Japan World Exposition ’70 for their financial supports for the symposium, and Japanese Association of Historical Botany, The Botanical Gardens of Tohoku University, Osaka Museum of Natural History, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Kinki Branch of Geological Society of Japan, Lake Biwa Museum, Mizunami Fossil Museum, Nagai Botanical Garden in Osaka and Minakuchi Kodomonomori Nature Museum for their support and cooperation, and also to all attendants with beautiful scientific presentations.

Photo1 Guidance sign on the way to the OMNH in Nagai Park (photo by Chris) Photo2 Noisy cicadas, Cryptotympana facialis, on Prunus trunk on the way to museum
Photo3 Welcome reception on August 3rd evening at OMNH (photo by Chris) Photo4 Group photo of attendants under whale specimen of OMNH
Photo5 Group photo just in front of River cruising boat for dinner Photo6 Dinner inside the cruising boat


Program of the Symposium
August 4 (Wednesday)
9:00-10:00 Opening Ceremony Opening Address by Prof. Mitsuo Suzuki, Chair of Organizing Committee
Opening Address by Dr. Ryohei Yamanishi, Director of OMNH
Opening Address by Dr. Ben A. LePage, Organizing Committee
10:00-11:40 Oral Session1 Metasequoia and associated conifers in the Cenozoic
Chaired by Ben A. LePage and Arata Momohara
10:00-10:20 Recent findings about Pinus trifolia flora
Minoru Tsukagoshi, Osaka Museum of Natural History, Osaka, Japan
10:20-10:40 Cuticular studies of Paleocene Cupressaceae (sensu lato) from Northeast Japan
Junji Horiuchi, Attached School, Tokyo Gakugei University, Tokyo, Japan
10:40-11:00 Taxodiaceous conifers from the Cenozoic of Thailand and surrounding regions
Paul J. Grote, Institute of Science, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand
11:00-11:20 The biogeography and evolution of Taxodium
Ben A. LePage, Natural Academy of Sciences, Philadelphia, , USA and Christopher J. Williams, Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, USA
11:20-11:40 Survival and extinction of Taxodiaceae in the Quaternary Japan
Arata Momohara, Graduate School of Horticulture, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan
11:40-11:55 Discussion of Session
11:55-12:10 Group Photo Assembly; in front of OMNH
12:10-13:30 Lunch
13:30-15:40 Oral Session4 Biology of the Taxodiaceae
Chaired by Jinshuang Ma and Paul J. Grote
13:30-13:50 The encyclopedia of Metasequoia
Jinshuang Ma, Shanghai Chenshan Plant Science Research Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences / Shanghai Chenshan Botanical Garden, Shanghai, China
13:50-14:10 A brief introduction to the biological surveys on Metasequoia within recent decade in China
Qing Wang, Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing, China and Yufei Wang, State Key Laboratory of Systematic and Evolutionary Botany, Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
14:10-14:30 Stable isotope compositions of living and fossil Metasequoia: Physiological and paleoclimatic interpretations
Hong Yang, Bryant University, Smithfield, USA
14:30-14:50 Paleoecology of Cunninghamia and Pseudotsuga from the earliest Miocene Shichiku Flora, northeast Japan
Atsushi Yabe, Fukui Prefectural Dinosaur Museum, Fukui, Japan
14:50-15:10 Phylogeography of East Asia Taxodiaceae species
Yen-Wei Chou, Institute of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, Philip I. Thomas, Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK Xue-Jun Ge, Key Laboratory of Plant Resources Conservation and Sustainable Utilization, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China, Ben A. LePage , Natural Academy of Sciences, Philadelphia, , USA and Chun-Neng Wang, Department of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan
15:10-15:30 Inferring past climate change response for Fitzroya cupressoides
Claire G. Williams, Forest History Society, Durham, USA, Victor Martinez, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile, Carlos Magni University of Chile, Santiago Chile and Ben A. LePage, Natural Academy of Sciences, Philadelphia, , USA
15:30-15:40 Project fro a botanical expedition in Southeastern Tibet (China)
Adrien Golinelli, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
15:40-16:00 Discussion of Session
16:00-17:00 Poster Session
P1 Early Pleistocene fossil pollen flora from the lowermost part of Osaka Group in the Yamashiro Hills, Kyoto
Kumiko Handa, Museum of Nature and Human Activities, Hyogo, Japan, Toshio Ikeda, Kyotanabe, Kyoto, Japan and Takashi Fujiwara, Wonder Stone Museum Masutomi Geology Museum, Kyoto, Japan
P2 Metasequoia responses to coastal environment changes due to sea-level variations in Osaka Bay, Japan
Ikuko Kitaba, Kobe University, Kobe, Japan, Masayuki Hyodo, Kobe University, Kobe, Japan, Shigehiro Katoh, Museum of Nature and Human Activities, Hyogo,, Japan, Hiroshi Sato University of Hyogo, Japan, and Mariko Matsushita, Nara National Research Institute for Cultural Properties, Nara, Japan
P3 Miocene Glyptostrobus and fossil forest from Shimokawa, Hokkaido, Japan
Midori Matsumoto, Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan, Kousuke Kashiwabara, Shimosato Junior High School, Tokyo, Japan and Kazuo Terada, Fukui Prefectural Dinosaur Museum, Katsuyama, Japan
P4 Fossil conifers from the Middle to the Late Pleistocene of Japan and three types of plant macrofossil assemblages, in relation to Miki’s “Plant macrofossil beds”
Mutsuhiko Minaki, Faculty of Commerce, University of Marketing and Distribution Sciences, Kobe, Japan
P5 Vegetation history since the last glacial period in the Shikoku Island, southwestern Japan: Temporal and spatial changes in the distribution of Cryptomeria japonica
Nao Miyake, Faculty of Science, Kochi University, Kochi, Japan, Jun Nakamura, Mitsuo Yamanaka, Takeshi Nakagawa and Mika Miyake
P6 On some Cenozoic cuppressoid (s.l.) remains from south of Chile
Harufumi Nishida, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Chuo University, Tokyo, Japan, Kazuo Terada, Fukui Prefectural Dinosaur Museum, Katsuyama, Japan, Kazuhiko Uemura, Department of Geology and Paleontology, National Museum of Nature and Science, Tokyo, Japan, Atsushi Yabe, Fukui Prefectural Dinosaur Museum, Katsuyama, Japan, Miguel H. Rancusi, Colegio Compa?ia de Maria, Santiago, Chile, Toshihiro Yamada, Faculty of Science, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan, Hiroshi Kurita, Faculty of Science, Niigata University, Niigata, Japan Takeshi Asakawa, Faculty of Science, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan and Luis Felipe Hinojosa, Facultad de Ciencias, Uiversidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile
P7 Identification of Japanese species of Cupressaceae s.l. from wood structure and implication of their identification for past timber usage in Japan
Shuichi Noshiro, Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute, Tsukuba, Japan, Hisashi Abe, Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute, Tsukuba, Japan and Yutaka Kataoka, Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute, Tsukuba, Japan
P8 Formation mechanism of ‘Matsuiwa’ (silicified wood of Taxodioxylon matsuiwa) included in the coal seam
Toru Oishi, Nippon Steel Kankyo Engineering, Tokyo, Japan and Takashi Furuyama, Tohoku University of Community Service and Science, Yamagata, Japan
P9 Metasequoia amber from the Miocene Yagii Formation, Saitama Prefecture, Japan
Takeshi Saito, Faculty of Science and Technology, Meijo University, Japan, Makiko Kobayashi, Graduate School of Horticulture, Chiba University, Japan and Arata Momohara, Graduate School of Horticulture, Chiba University, Japan
P10 Wood and pollen assemblages in the early Holocene at the Fukuchi Valley in Hyogo Prefecture, Japan
Akita Takahashi, Institute of Natural and Environmental Sciences, University of Hyogo, Hyogo, Japan, Kumiko Handa, Museum of Nature and Human Activities, Hyogo, Japan, Shigehiro Katoh, Museum of Nature and Human Activities, Hyogo, Japan and Hiroshi Furutani, Institute of Natural and Environmental Sciences, University of Hyogo, Hyogo, Japan
P11 The life and works of Dr. Shigeru Miki
Minoru Tsukagoshi, Osaka Museum of Natural History, Osaka, Japan, Arata Momohara, Graduate School of Horticulture, Chiba University, Japan and Mutsuhiko Minaki, University of Marketing and Distribution Sciences, Kobe, Japan
P12 Cenozoic deciduous taxodiaceous conifers in Japan and its adjacent areas
Kazuhiko Uemura, Department of Geology and Paleontology, National Museum of Nature and Science, Tokyo, Japan, Junji Yamamoto, Tajikano-cho, Nishinomiya, Japan and Michio Yonesaka, Ichigatani-cho, Nishinomiya, Japan
P13 Miki’s discovery of Metasequoia and Cenozoic paleobotany in Japan
Kazuhiko Uemura, Department of Geology and Paleontology, National Museum of Nature and Science, Tokyo, Japan
P14 A new method to prepare clean cuticular membrane from fossil leaves with thin and fragile cuticles
Li Wang, Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing, China and Qin Leng, Department of Science and Technology, Bryant University, Smithfield, USA
18:50-21:00 Dinner Party (River cruise on a traditional Japanese boat)


August 5 (Thursday)
9:30-11:10 Oral Session2 Taxodioxylon and the history of taxodiaceous conifers
Chaired by Kyungsik Kim and Kazuo Terada
9:30-9:50 First discovery of fossil woods of Cupressaceae sensu lato from the Early Cretaceous Kitadani Formation of the Tetori Group, and its paleofloristic significance
Kazuo Terada, Fukui Prefectural Dinosaur Museum, Katsuyama, Japan
9:50-10:10 Conifer fossil woods of the Cretaceous in Northeast Asia: Occurrences and paleobiological implications
Changhwan Oh, Division of Biological Sciences, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Korea, Kyungsik Kim, Division of Biological Sciences, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Korea, In-Sung Paik, Department of Environmental Geosciences, Pukyong National University, Pusan, Korea and Jong-Deock Lim, Natural Heritage Center National Research Institute of Cultural Heritage, Daejeon, Korea
10:10-10:30 Taxodiaceous woods in Lusatia?Intriguing findings of the European Cenozoic
Martina Dolezych, Senckenberg Museum of Geology and Mineralogy, Dresden, Germany
10:30-10:50 Fossil woods from the Hatamura Formation (Middle Miocene) of Akita Prefecture in Japan
Eun-Kyoung Jeong, Division of Biological Sciences, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Korea, Kyungsik Kim, Division of Biological Sciences, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Korea, and Mitsuo Suzuki, Botanical Gardens, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
10:50-11:10 Temporal and spatial distribution of the fossil forests dominated by Metasequoia and Glyptostrobus from the lower Pleistocene Kobiwako Group, Japan
Chiyomi Yamakawa, Biwa Lake Museum, Kusatsu, Japan, Arata Momohara, Graduate School of Horticulture, Chiba University, Japan, Midori Matsumoto, Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan, and Tomoo Nunotani, Biwa Lake Museum, Kusatsu, Japan
11:10-11:25 Discussion of Session
11:25-13:00 Lunch
13:00-14:40 Oral Session3 Taxodiaceous fossil forests in time and space
Chaired by Christopher J. Williams and Kazuo Terada
13:00-13:20 An overview of the studies on the Pliocene “taxodiaceous” fossil forest of the Stura di Lanzo River (NW Italy)
Elena Vassio, Department of Earth Sciences, Torino Univesity, Torino, Italy and Edoardo Martinetto, Department of Earth Sciences, Torino Univesity, Torino, Italy
13:20-13:40 Structure of the 7 million years old Bükkábrány fossil forest in Hungary
Miklós Kázmér, Department of Palaeontology, Eotvos University, Budapest, Hungary
13:40-14:00 A Middle Miocene Metasequoia forest in northwestern Kanto Plain, central Japan
Makiko Kobayashi, Graduate School of Horticulture, Chiba University, Japan and Arata Momohara, Graduate School of Horticulture, Chiba University, Japan
14:00-14:20 Paleoecology and paleoclimate of the Early Eocene Chickaloon Formation, Alaska, USA
Christopher J. Williams, Department of Earth & Environment, Franklin & Marshall College, Lancaster, USA and David Sunderlin, Department of Geology & Environmental Geosciences, Lafayette College, Easton, USA
14:20-14:40 (cancelled)
14:20-14:55 Discussion of Session
14:55-15:25 Tea Break
15:25-17:05 Oral Session5 Conservation and the future of Metasequoia
Chaired by Qin Leng and Shuichi Noshiro
15:25?-15:45 The end of an era??The conservation status of redwoods and other members of the former Taxodiaceae in the 21st century
Philip Thomas, Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK and Ben A. LePage, Natural Academy of Sciences, Philadelphia, , USA
15:45-16:05 Relict Metasequoia glyptostroboides population in south-central China: Threats to its survival
Cindy Q.Tang, Institute of Ecology and Geobotany, Yunnan University, Kunming, China, Yongchuan Yang, Faculty of Urban Construction and Environmental Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing, China, Masahiko Ohsawa, Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Arata Momohara, Graduate School of Horticulture, Chiba University, Japan, Masatoshi Hara, Natural History Museum and Institute, Chiba, Japan, Shoulin Cheng, Hubei Xingdoushan National Nature Reserve Administration Bureau Enshi, China and Shenghou Fan, Lichuan Metasequoia Management Office, Lichuan, China
16:05-16:25 Study on individual death and interference factors of primary Metasequoia glyptostroboides mother trees
Biao Xiong, School of Biological Science and Technology, Hubei University for Nationalities, Enshi, China, Xun-ru Ai, School of Biological Science and Technology, Hubei University for Nationalities, Enshi, China, Bo-quan Wang, School of Biological Science and Technology, Hubei University for Nationalities, Enshi, China, Yong-mei Yi, School of Biological Science and Technology, Hubei University for Nationalities, Enshi, China, Lan Yao, School of Biological Science and Technology, Hubei University for Nationalities, Enshi, China and Shen-hou Fan, Hubei Lichuan Metasequoia Mother Trees Administrative Station, Lichuan, China
16:25-16:45 The mystery of the occurrence of Even Type of cuticles in living and fossil Metasequoia
Qin Leng, Department of Science and Technology, Bryant University, Smithfield, USA, Li Wang, Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China, Hong Yang, Department of Science and Technology, Bryant University, Smithfield, USA and Chunxiang Li, Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing, China
16:45-17:05 The legacy of John Kuser’s Metasequoia glyptostroboides research and continuation of his work at Rutgers University
Ari E. Novy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA, Sasha Eisenman, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA, Ramya Ramiviram, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA, Stacy Bonos, Jason Grabosky, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA and Lena Struwe, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA
17:05-17:20 Discussion of Session
17:20-17:40 Closing Ceremony

Photo7 Presentation (photo by Chris) Photo8 Presentation


Summary of the Symposium (by Christopher J. WILLIAMS)
1) New international connections.
2) Significant new insights on Metasequoia biogeography and related taxa.
3) Update on natural and ex situ Metasequoia populations
4) Extensive information exchange about fossil materials from a diverse array of countries.
5) Detailed information on new methods of preparing and conserving fossil material.
6) Paleoclimate-biogeography relationships


Proceedings
And, it was decided by the organizing committee that the proceedings of this symposium would be published in next April. The attendants are strongly recommended to submit papers until end of September 2010. The instruction for authors is as below.
Guidelines for manuscript preparation for the Proceedings of the Third Metasequoia Symposium
Publication form (tentative) Special issue of the Japanese Journal of Historical Botany
Publication date (prospective) April 2011
Editorial board Shuichi Noshiro, Ben A LePage, Qin Leng, Arata Momohara, Harufumi Nishida, Kazuhiko Uemura, Christopher J Williams, Hong Yang
Review procedure Manuscripts will be peer reviewed by at least two reviewers.
Deadline for submission of the manuscript 30 September 2010
Address for electronic submission e-mail: noshiro#affrc.go.jp
(Caution!!: Please change # to @ in sending your e-mail.)
Manuscript preparation An electronic manuscript, and separate files for figures and tables should be sent to the above address. The manuscript file should include, Title Page (author names, affiliations and addresses, author correspondence), Abstract (less than 200 words), Text, References, and Legends for Figures and Tables. Do not insert tables or figures in the text file.
File format Text: MS Word or Word compatible file
Paper format: A4
Margins: 25 mm on all sides
Text: Double space, flush left, font size 11-12 points
Tables: MS Excel or Excel compatible files
Figures (do not use colors)
Bit map images: Adobe Photoshop or compatible files, PDFs, TIFF files
(Minimum dpi: Gray scale images 350 dpi, B&W images 600 dpi in print size)
Vector images: Adobe Illustrator or EPS files, PDFs
Citation In text:
Shimizu (1989), Shimizu & Mizuno (1989), Shimizu et al. (1989), (Shimizu, 1988, 1989; Shimizu & Mizuno, 1989)

Reference list:
Cite in the alphabetical order of the first, second, and third authors.
Cite references of the same author(s) chronologically.
(example)
Creber, J.T. & Francis, J.E. 1999. Fossil tree-ring analysis: palaeodendrology. In: Jones, T.P. & Rowe, N.P., eds., Fossil Plants and Spores: Modern Techniques, 245-250. Geological Society, London.
Niklas, K.J. 1994. Predicting the height of fossil plant remains: an allometric approach to an old problem. American Journal of Botany 81: 1235-1242.
Stewart, W.N. 1983. Paleobotany and the evolution of plants. 450 pp. Cambridge University Press, New York.


Excursion report (reported by Harufumi Nishida)
Day 1: August 6 (Friday) Sunny, max. 36℃
8:15 Departure from AOTS Kansai Kenshu Center by chartered bus
Stop at Otsu Service Area with panoramic view of the Lake Biwa
10:30 Arrival to the Lake Biwa Museum at Kusatsu, Shiga Prefecture
Exhibition of a Pleistocene Metasequoia forest in the Kobiwako Group
After a greeting from the Museum Director, Dr. Toru Shinohara, who is an anthropologist, the group moved to the exhibit of the Pleistocene Metasequoia reconstructed forest.
11:30 Lunch in the museum restaurant and museum sight-seeing
Freshwater aquaria with fishes and mollusca endemic to the Lake Biwa are one of major interests of the museum.
13:00 Observation on plant fossil specimens in the museum laboratory
Various array of plant organs from the fossil sites along the Echi River were exhibited and could be observed using binoculars and microscopes. Type specimens of Wataria wood also attracted participants.
14:20 Departure from the museum
15:00 Arrival at Yoshinaga site, Konan, Shiga Prefecture
Observation on the latest Pliocene Yoshinaga fossil forest dominated by Metasequoia and Glyptostrobus
16:30 Departure from the Yoshinaga site
18:40 The Harmonie Terrasse Wedding Hotel in Gifu, Gifu Prefecture
19:30 Dinner in the hotel
Enjoyed beautiful decoration and excellent taste of food.
The cormorant fishing watch in the Nagara River was canceled because of schedule delay.

Photo9 Welcome greeting by Museum Director Photo10 Observing specimens at museum laboratory Photo11 Huge Metasequoia ovuliferous cone
Photo12 Metasequoia cones from Echi River site Photo13 Thanks to Dr. Chiyomi Yamakawa Photo14 Yoshinaga site bearing Metasequoia wood

Day 2: August 7 (Saturday) Sunny, max. 36℃
7:00 Breakfast in the hotel
8:15 Departure from the hotel
9:00 Arrival to the Minokamo Fossil Forest Park, Minokamo, Gifu Prefecture
Observation on an early Miocene petrified forest dominated by Wataria, Sterculiaceae
Only about 10 fossil stums were exposed because of the high water level by heavy rain last night.
9:35 Depart for Toki, Gifu Prefecture
10:00 Arrival at the Hishiya opencast mine,
The early late Miocene fossil site of the Tokiguchi Porcelain Clay Formation
Although Metasequoia remains could not be found, various organs of other components of Miki’s Pinus trifolia bed flora have been observed and collected. Beautiful ovuliferous cones of Pinus trifolia and Glyptostrobus fascinated most of the participants.
11:45 Departure for Mizunami, Gifu Prefecture
12:10 Arrival and lunch at Mizunami Geoscience Center
13:10 The Mizunami Fossil Museum of Mizunami City
Observation on Miocene fossil collection from Mizunami, and museum exhibition after an explanation by the Museum Director, Mr. Shigemi Sudo.
14:00 Departure from the museum
16:45 Arrival to Kyorai-So Inn at Akasawa Natural Forest Park, Agematsu, Nagano Prefecture
Left three colleagues from Uematsu Station.
18:00 Dinner at the inn
Selected local dishes using fauna and flora of the region were served. Hoba (Magnolia grandifolia leaf) Yaki (grill) is a typical local style of cooking.

Photo15 Hotel breakfast Photo16 Gifu Castle and the Nagara River Photo17 Minokamo Fossil Forest Park
Photo18 Hishiya Open Cast Mine Photo19 Pinus trifolia ovuliferous cone Photo20 With a Glyptostrobus shoot
Photo21 Director of Mizunami Fossil Museum Photo22 In front of the Museum


Day 3: August 8 (Sunday) Cloudy, max. 33℃
7:00 Breakfast at the inn
8:00 Hiking in Chamaecyparis obtusa forest in Akasawa (ca. 1200 m alt.)
Walked into a Chamaecyparis forest preserved for Ise Shrine timber supply guided by Mr. Takeshi Miura. Elements of mixed broadleaf deciduous forest were observed.
9:55 Departure for Tsumago, Nagano Prefecture
11:30 Arrival and lunch at restaurant near Tsumago
Boiled Soba (Phagopyrum esculentum: buckwheat) noodle of Hachiwari Soba (80% ground Soba powder and 20 % flour) type, mixed Sushi wrapped with Hoba (Magnolia grandifolia leaf), and pork cooked with mushrooms on a porcelain pan were served.
12:30 Depart to Tsumago
12:35 Sight-seeing and traditional souvenir shopping at Tsumago
13:45 Leaving Tsumago
Left seven colleagues from Tsumago bus stop.
Stops at Yoro Service Area and Kusatsu Service Area
19:05 Arrival at AOTS Kansai Kenshu Center

Photo23 Ready to go into the forest Photo24 Mr. Miura explains natural regeneration of conifers started on dead tree trunk. Photo25 Lunch at a restaurant near Tsumago
Photo26 Future pillar of Ise Shrine

Acknowledgements for the excursion
The field excursion is financially supported by the Tokyo Club, the Expo'90 Foundation, and the Commemorative Organization for the Japan World Exposition '70. This excursion could not have taken place without the generous assistance and support from the Biwa Lake Museum, Mizunami Fossil Museum, and Hishiya Mine Company Ltd. Special thanks are due to Mr. Yasuji Kawai, Koyo Junior High School, Mitake and Kani History Museum for providing us with information of the fossil sites and the venue for this excursion, and to Mr. Shogo Konishi, Minakuchi Kodomonomori Nature Museum for his assistance to prepare the sites observed during this excursion. Special thanks are also extended to the Heibonsha Ltd. for permission to reproduce and arrange the botanical illustrations in Okuyama (1977) “Terasaki’s Illustrated Flora of Japan” that was used in Appendix III of the excursion guide.
Finally all the participants are delighted to have experienced an excellent time with full of scientific as well as social interests, including fine food and Sake. All of our gratefulness is sent to Dr. Arata MOMOHARA, the excursion leader, and all other staffs who supported the trip in various ways. See you all in IPC XIII/IOPC IX Tokyo in 2012 or elsewhere earlier.

Photo27 Now and past at Tsumago
Program of the Symposium
Summary of the Symposium
Proceedings
Excursion report

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